library-lessons:

-via The Reading Room

library-lessons:

-via The Reading Room

beautiesofafrique:

ohfalada:

"Tango Negro, The African Roots of Tango by Angolan filmmaker Dom Pedro explores the expression of Tango’s Africanness and the contribution of African cultures in the creation of the tango. Tango was a reflection of the social life of the slaves that were taken to South America — including Argentina and Uruguay — mostly from central Africa, particularly from the former Kongo Kingdom. Director Dom Pedro reveals the depth of the footprints of the African music on the tango, through this rich movie combining musical performances and interviews from many tango fans and historians in Latin America and Europe, including the renowned Argentinean pianist Juan Carlos Caceres."

Directed by Dom Pedro, 2013, 93 min., France, Documentary , French/Spanish/ English subt. - US Distributors - ArtMattan Films www.AfricanFilm.com

This is important 

hope-in-every-book:

svyalitchat:

The #SVYALit Project: Using YA Lit to talk about sexual violence and consent in the lives of teens. Here are a few book lists and book reviews.

Because No Always Mean No, a list of books dealing with sexual assault  
Take 5: Difficult books on an important topic (sexual violence)
Take 5: Sexual Violence in the Life of Boys  
Book Review: The Gospel of Winter by Brendan Kiely 
Thinking About Boys, Sex, and Sex & Violence by Carrie Mesrobian 
What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton 
Plus One by Elizabeth Fama
September Girls by Bennett Madison  
Discussing THE S WORD by Chelsea Pitcher, a guest post by Lourdes Keochgerien
5 Reasons I Loved Faking Normal by Courtney C. Stevens
Charm and Strange by Stephanie Khuen
The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu
The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski
Uses for Boys by Erica Loraine Scheidt
Killer Instinct by S. E. Green

Live Through This by Mindi Scott

Sex/Consent Positive Titles: Karen’s List Christa’s List Carrie’s List

See the complete #SVYALit Project Index Here: http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2014/02/svyalit-project-index.html

This is important. Could very well help those struggling to read these books. Don’t leave anyone in the dark.

nattygirls:

Natty Girls in entertainment (Present and Forthcoming)

Leni Zieglmeier stars as “Wendy Darling” in Pan (2015)*

Crystal Clarke and Academy Award winner Lupita Nyong’o star in Star Wars Episode V11 (2015)

Quvenzhané Wallis stars as “Annie” in Annie (2014)**

C.S.R. Calloway (csrcalloway) brings us “King” in Lost: a Never novella (2014)

Jeremy Whitley (princelesscomic) brings us “Princess Adrienne” in Princeless (2012)

SAG nominee Keke Palmer is the youngest talk show host in history with “Just Keke” (2014)

Rihanna voices “Gratuity ‘Tip’ Tucci” in Home (2015)

Milton J. Davis brings us “Amber” in Amber and the Hidden City (2013)

*(the Pan filmmakers chose to forgo casting an indigenous actress for “Tiger Lily,” however, choosing instead to go with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo's Rooney Mara)

**film also features Rent star Tracie Thoms

Dialogue Should Move the Story Forward, Provide Information, or Enhance Characterization, Unless You’re Really Witty

The best dialogue can do all three. This is a rule that’s often broken by great writers, but before you can get away with breaking it, you have to understand why it exists. Recently, I reread one of my first stories. I thought it would be fun to reread, but I was disappointed in much of the dialogue. In the middle of a scene, my heroine Mildred and the housekeeper broke into an exchange about what my heroine wanted for dinner. I think they were the only two people in the world who cared about it. Readers never even got to see them eat this dinner, and the exchange had no point. It didn’t advance the plot, and it told us nothing about Mildred except that she hated sour beef and dumplings.

But let’s say you’re writing a romantic mystery where several people are poisoned by arsenic in the sour beef and dumplings. Suddenly that exchange becomes crucial because the reader knows Mildred was spared because she didn’t like the dish — does this mean the killer poisoned that dish because he didn’t want her to die? Or let’s say the point of the scene is that Mildred’s late father is a famous chef whose specialty was sour beef and dumplings, and Mildred confesses that no longer eats this dish because it brings back too many memories. Now the scene tells us something about Mildred’s personality, not just about her food intake. It wouldn’t take much work to use this exchange to move the plot forward while telling us something about Mildred and sharing the information about the food she likes.

Are you a witty author? Are you sure? If so, then you can get away with writing dialogue that doesn’t advance the plot, doesn’t tell us anything about the character, and doesn’t provide information to the reader. But even if you can get away with it, why should you do this? Even the most sparkling dialogue won’t help your story if it’s completely empty of anything but wit.

Anne Marble, Writing Romantic Dialogue (via cleverhelp)
theafrocentricasian:

Our children are being criminally shortchanged in the public school system of America. The Afro-American schools are the poorest-run schools in the city of New York. Principals and teachers fail to understand the nature of the problems with which they work and as a result they cannot do the job of teaching our children.
    They don’t understand us, nor do they understand our problems; they don’t. The textbooks tell our children nothing about the great contributions of Afro-Americans to the growth and development of this country, and they don’t.
    When we send our children to school in this country they learn nothing about us other than that we used to be cotton pickers. Every little child going to school thinks his grandfather was a cotton picker. Why, your grandfather was Nat Turner; your grandfather was Toussaint L’Ouverture; your grandfather was Hannibal. Your grandfather was some of the greatest black people who walked on this earth. It was your grandfather’s hands who forged civilization and it was your grandmother’s hands who rocked the cradle of civilization But the textbooks tell our children nothing about the great contributions of Afro-Americans to the growth and development of this country.—-Malcolm X, June 28, 1964
-afro-centricqueen.

theafrocentricasian:

Our children are being criminally shortchanged in the public school system of America. The Afro-American schools are the poorest-run schools in the city of New York. Principals and teachers fail to understand the nature of the problems with which they work and as a result they cannot do the job of teaching our children.


    They don’t understand us, nor do they understand our problems; they don’t. The textbooks tell our children nothing about the great contributions of Afro-Americans to the growth and development of this country, and they don’t.


    When we send our children to school in this country they learn nothing about us other than that we used to be cotton pickers. Every little child going to school thinks his grandfather was a cotton picker. Why, your grandfather was Nat Turner; your grandfather was Toussaint L’Ouverture; your grandfather was Hannibal. Your grandfather was some of the greatest black people who walked on this earth. It was your grandfather’s hands who forged civilization and it was your grandmother’s hands who rocked the cradle of civilization But the textbooks tell our children nothing about the great contributions of Afro-Americans to the growth and development of this country.

—-Malcolm X, June 28, 1964

-afro-centricqueen.

✍ Finally, an ask-meme for writers! ✍
01: When did you first start writing?
02: What was your favorite book growing up?
03: Are you an avid reader?
04: Have you ever thrown a book across the room?
05: Did you take writing courses in school/college?
06: Have you read any writing-advice books?
07: Have you ever been part of a critique group?
08: What’s the best piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
09: What’s the worst piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
10: What’s your biggest writer pet-peeve?
11: What’s your favorite book cover?
12: Who is your favorite author?
13: What’s your favorite writing quote?
14: What’s your favorite writing blog? c;
15: What would you say has inspired you the most?
16: How do you feel about movies based on books?
17: Would you like your books to be turned into TV shows, movies, video games, or none?
18: How do you feel about love triangles?
19: Do you prefer writing on a computer or longhand?
20: What’s your favorite writing program?
21: Do you outline?
22: Do you start with characters or plot?
23: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of making characters?
24: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of plotting?
25: What advice would you give to young writers?
26: Which do you enjoy reading the most: physical, ebook, or both?
27: Which is your favorite genre to write?
28: Which do you find hardest: the beginning, the middle, or the end?
29: Which do you find easiest: writing or editing?
30: Have you ever written fan-fiction?
31: Have you ever been published?
32: How do you feel about friends and close relatives reading your work?
33: Are you interested in having your work published?
34: Describe your writing space.
35: What’s your favorite time of day for writing?
36: Do you listen to music when you write?
37: What’s your oldest WIP?
38: What’s your current WIP?
39: What’s the weirdest story idea you’ve ever had?
40: Which is your favorite original character, and why?
41: What do you do when characters don’t follow the outline?
42: Do you enjoy making your characters suffer?
43: Have you ever killed a main character?
44: What’s the weirdest character concept you’ve ever come up with?
45: What’s your favorite character name?
46: Describe your perfect writing space.
47: If you could steal one character from another author and make then yours, who would it be and why?
48: If you could write the next book of any series, which one would it be, and what would you make the book about?
49: If you could write a collaboration with another author, who would it be and what would you write about?
50: If you could live in any fictional world, which would it be?
This could be fun.

blasianxbri:

duragdaddy:

flvcoshvlom:

ellecareyart:

2brwngrls:

simplysupreme:

image

HERE FOR THIS

young.black.educated.confident. i don’t see a thug here. at all.

"I’m better at life than you."

yessssssss woo

he inspires me lol

Genetics? Two of my characters are having alot of children, is it possible to have children with three different hair colors who are all related to the same two parents?
Anonymous

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Short answer: Yes!

Longer answer: That depends upon what hair colors we’re talking about, and what kind of genetic background the parents have. For example, because red hair is a recessive trait, two red-haired parents will only have red haired children. A set of parents who are heterozygous for black and red hair, and brown and red hair, respectively, could have children with black, brown, or red hair. Additionally, there are factors like how early individuals in the family start to go gray- which isn’t exactly a different color, but would make a young person look different from their siblings. There are also traits like albinism and forms of partial albinism that can affect hair color. So, really, there can be a decent amount of variation in a family group. (They will still look like each other, though!) Do some reasearch, see what’s plausible. 

Further reading: 

Human hair color

The Tech: Hair color

Myths of Human Genetics

Good luck!
-Evvy