Hello! Loving your blog. I'm writing a story that one day i hope to get published. However, I haven't written in a while, I'm a bit rusty. Do you have any exercises that could help me or any tips?

fixyourwritinghabits:

One way to get into the swing of things it to try writing prompts and free writing. There’s a lot of tumblrs out there that you can follow for them!

You can also experiment with different types of writing - poetry, songwriting, etc - to stretch your writing muscles a bit. Joining a writing group or taking part in writing exercises can help a lot too! You can find writing exercises at:

Other ideas: create a daily notebook, free write for fifteen minutes a day, try writing about your favorite characters, pick an object in your room and detail its history, etc. Pretty much anything can flex your writing muscles, as long as you try it!

I'm writing in 1st person as a blind character. I've been having a difficult time describing what's happening. Do you have any tip?

fixyourwritinghabits:

aconitine-apothecary:

fixyourwritinghabits:

This depends on a few things. First, you have different degrees of sight impairment: no vision or residual vision, meaning that the person’s vision isn’t completely gone but their vision is impaired to a degree that they’re considered legally blind. Second - if I’m recalling the education I received from a charity right - more people lose their sight later on in life than are born visually impaired. And according to some quick Google research, people whose vision begins to recede over the age of seven do tend to retain memories of how things looked. So you could work off memory, along with describing the input from other senses: touch, smell, sound, taste. Or work off those senses alone if you’re writing a character who is blind from birth.

It would probably help to search and read books by and about blind people, just so you can familiarize yourself with what everyday life is like from them. Blindness has been around a long time, and looking into the past and present treatment and views on it can help give you a wider perspective on what a blind character would have to face in terms of attitudes and faulty ideas. Those who have been born blind would not have and may not want a sense of what seeing is like, as it has never been a part of their lives.

Some books links:

And here are some other links:

Yooo… more blind writing refs (my favorite kind because of reasons that involve my story, also writing blind characters is hella fun to me for some reason).

Also that masterpost I did a while back is here if it helps.

My best advice is to pay attention to all the other senses—you can get a hell of a lot of description out of them once you start thinking beyond what things look like.

Thanks!

writeworld:

Writing Fiction For Dummies

From Writing Fiction For Dummies by Randy Ingermanson, Peter Economy
diasporicroots:

Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern
Van Sertima provides literary proof of Africans excelling in Science before the scramble for Africa by Europe. What Europeans thought of as witchdoctors were actually people that had great knowledge of herbal traditional medicine. For example the recent find of the South African bush willow which has been shown to help with the treatment of cancer.  Recommended for anyone searching for knowledge this book shatters the myths of primitive Africans. It explores evidence such as ancient ruins of a astronomical observatory found in Kenya and the  secret societies that communicated with symbols and signs, and had a form of written language.
Highly recommended !!!

diasporicroots:

Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern

Van Sertima provides literary proof of Africans excelling in Science before the scramble for Africa by Europe. What Europeans thought of as witchdoctors were actually people that had great knowledge of herbal traditional medicine. For example the recent find of the South African bush willow which has been shown to help with the treatment of cancer.  Recommended for anyone searching for knowledge this book shatters the myths of primitive Africans. It explores evidence such as ancient ruins of a astronomical observatory found in Kenya and the  secret societies that communicated with symbols and signs, and had a form of written language.

Highly recommended !!!

I think I need to steer clear of male social wokers… or maybe guys who are socially awkward… or both.

The single life saga… never a dull moment.

I'm 41 with very oily skin. If I use a matte/oil-control foundation my skin looks dead. If I use a foundation for dry skin my skin looks amazing. Oil control foundations have a little bit of better staying power on me. What would you advice in this case? Should I sacrifice staying power for a better looking skin?

makeuploversunite:

A few things you can do!

  1. Use a matte, long wearing foundation and add glow to prevent the skin from looking too dull
  2. Use a dewy, hydrating foundation and using oil controlling primers and translucent powder on your oily areas
  3. Mixing some of your favorite moisturizer with your matte foundation to give a little glow

When using a matte, long wearing foundation you can add glow by using a shimmery highlighter on the cheekbones, down the nose, a little on the chin or anywhere you want to add a little sheen! You can give the face a little glow by using a cream blush or shimmery blush. You could also use a shimmery, glowing primer underneath that will show through under foundation like Loreal Magic Lumi Primer, Dior Glow Maximizer Primer or Tarte Clean Slate 24hr Brightening Primer.

This way you’re adding some glow to the skin to keep it from looking dull and flat but still keeping your foundation long wearing!

When using a dewy, hydrating foundation you’ll need an oil controlling primer to keep your foundation from sliding off. Some great primers I recommend are Hourglass Mineral Veil Primer, Smashbox Photofinish Light Primer, Rimmel Stay Matte Primer & Clinique Pore Refining Instant Perfector. I also recommend using a translucent powder on your oily areas, translucent powders are great at controlling oils but never look too matte or dull on the skin.

Keeping your skin care targeted for oily skin by using mud masks and charcoal masks will help prevent production of oils skin as well so you’ll able to wear more hydrating foundations.

yareviewnetwork:

pickeringtonlibrary:

Some new books to add to your 2014 TBR piles…

It’s still a great year for series, both new and ongoing, but if you’re in the mood for a story that begins and ends with one book, here are a few of the novels for (most of) the latter half of the year - ranging from science fiction and fantasy to paranormal to realistic contemporary - that have us intrigued. And of course they’re not the only ones on our radar - visit us on Goodreads to find many, many more! 

Follow the links to find copies of available books in our catalog:

Free to Fall, Lauren Miller

Everything Leads to You, Nina Lacour

Inland, Kat Rosenfield

Say What You Will, Cammie McGovern

Complicit, Stephanie Kuehn

Conversion, Katherine Howe

Fiendish, Brenna Yovanoff

(Don’t You) Forget About Me, Kate Karyus Quinn

Servants of the Storm, Delilah Dawson

Beware the Wild, Natalie Parker

Illusions of Fate, Kiersten White

Belzhar, Meg Wolitzer

Stitching Snow, R.C. Lewis

Afterworlds, Scott Westerfeld

Falling into Place, Amy Zhang

Kiss of Broken Glass, Madeline Kuderick

Bleed Like Me, Christa Desir

AHH! Seeing this list of YA books that have not come out yet is killing me. 

You can imagine then what happened to me yesterday after I started peeking about the 2016 YA releases: I was reincarnated - thrice. 

Being a bit dramatic are we, Lourdes?

No. No, I am not. 

YA does this to people. 

This is the language of privilege – the audacity of standing at the top of a mountain you made on the backs of others and then yelling at people for being at the bottom. If it’s not the intangible Market that’s to blame, it’s the writers of color, who maybe don’t have what it takes and don’t submit enough anyway. Read the subtextual coding here – the agent first places the onus of change on the folks with the least institutional power to effect it, then suggests we probably won’t be able to find the time (i.e., lazy) to master the craft.
Author Daniel Jose Older on Buzzfeed, responding to this panel of literary agents discussing the lack of diversity in publishing. (via tubooks)

writingbox:

Protagonist: the central character tied into the main storyline. Their goals fuel the action and their own personal journey.

Antagonist: the character whose goals directly oppose those of the protagonist. They are not necessarily an ‘evil’ character or ‘the baddie’, but their…